Making the most of your trip.

The Lake District is packed with famous award-winning attractions. Whether you are discovering the life and works of one of the many famous poets that have resided here, or climbing through the trees to cruising across one of the many beautiful lakes. The variety of visitor attractions on offer in the Lake Disrict ensure that all ages and interests are catered for. There is something for individual adventure seekers as well as families and couples.

Ambleside

Thanks to Ambleside’s magnificent setting at the head of Lake Windermere , there’s plenty of things to do in Ambleside. It’s probably best known for being the perfect base for exploring the heart of the Lake District. You are in walkers’ heaven in Ambleside – enjoy gentle rambles through the Rydal and Grasmere valleys and climbs to spectacular views from Loughrigg and Wansfell. Rooted in the medieval woollen trade, Ambleside is predominantly a Victorian town, built of dark grey slate. There are many restaurants and other places to eat in Ambleside  and an exciting range of arts, crafts, jewellery and interior design shops.

Hill Top, Home of Beatrix Potter

Hill Top is a time capsule of this amazing woman’s life. Full of her favourite things, the house appears as if Beatrix had just stepped out for a walk. Every room contains a reference to a picture in a ‘Tale’. Beatrix used Hill Top and its surroundings as inspiration for many of her ‘little books’ – you’ll recognise the rhubarb patch where Jemima Puddle-Duck laid her egg and the garden where Tom Kitten and his sisters played.

Windermere Lake Cruises

Windermere Lake Cruises trace their origins back to Victorian days, steamers and launches carry over 1.35 million visitors each year. The steamers have saloons, promenade decks, teashops and licensed bars. A fleet of passenger launches supplement the service. Boats operate an extensive route network linking the main settlements. A popular outing is the 45-minute Islands Cruise from Bowness, which passes wooded islands and secluded bays. A 40-minute trip from Ambleside offers free entry to the Lake District Visitor centre at Brockhole with its exhibitions, playgrounds, gardens and restaurant. The main cruise operates daily throughout the year between Ambleside, Bowness and Lakeside, except christmas day, this takes 3 hours but passengers may get on and off the vessel, if they wish, to sample the delights of the steam railway, aquarium, the world of Beatrix Potter attraction, Ambleside museum and the little towns and villages around the lake.

The Grasmere Gingerbread Shop

Discover this tiny Lakeland shop tucked away at the corner of the churchyard of St. Oswald’s Church. Victorian cook Sarah Nelson invented Grasmere Gingerbread® in 1854 in the English Lake District village from where it gets its name. A unique, spicy-sweet cross between a biscuit and cake, its reputation quickly spread and it is now enjoyed by food lovers all over the world.

Grasmere

Grasmere is probably the Cumbria’s most popular village, thanks to William Wordsworth (1770-1850). Today Grasmere is totally given over to the tourist industry, with plenty of gift shops, and places to eat and stay. Most of the buildings date from the 19th or early 20th Century, though the farms around Grasmere are much older. The Church dates from the 13th Century.

Wray Castle

Wray Castle is a National Trust owned family friendly mock-Gothic castle on the shores of Lake Windermere with turrets, towers, informal grounds, and Peter Rabbit adventure. The grounds offer a great place for a stroll with amazing views of the local fells and access to Windermere Lake shore, all year round. There are some magnificent specimen trees to look at, and lovely picnic spots too.